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NY hospitals are supplying vitamin C to their coronavirus-infected patients.

On March 24, the NY Post reported that NY hospitals are administering vitamin C to their coronavirus-infected patients.


Dr. Andrew G. Weber, a pulmonologist at Northwell Health on Long Island, said his intensive care patients with the virus, immediately hospitalized, receive 1,500 milligrams of intravenous vitamin C. You are getting this dose three or four times a day. This treatment, Dr. Weber said, is based on the experience they had in Shanghai, China.


It is reported that 23 hospitals, including Lenox Hill of upper Manhattan's East Side, are using vitamin C as well.


In hospitals, patients infected with the virus are being given a cocktail of vitamin C, antimalarial medicine (hydroxychloroquine), the antibiotic azithromycin, and anticoagulants, Dr. Weber added.


It has been observed that vitamin C has dramatically lowered the sepsis suffered by patients. Sepsis is the inflammatory response that occurs in the body as a reaction to infection. 

Dr. Weber said, "It makes all the sense in the world to use and maintain those levels of vitamin C in patients. »


What is vitamin C? What is it for?


Vitamin C is a water-soluble nutrient. It is an antioxidant that helps protect cells against damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are compounds that are formed when the body converts the food we consume into energy. People are also exposed to free radicals present in the environment from cigarette smoke, air pollution, and ultraviolet solar radiation.


In addition, the body needs vitamin C to produce collagen. Vitamin C also improves the absorption of iron present in plant foods and contributes to the proper functioning of the immune system to protect the body against disease.


What foods are a source of vitamin C?


Fruits and vegetables are the best sources of vitamin C.


Below is a list of some fruits and vegetables and the amount of vitamin C contained in 1/2 cup of that food. 


Fruits:

· Citrus fruits such as lemons, oranges, and red blood, 200 mg of vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Guava, 228 mg of vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Melon, 18 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Kiwi, 100 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Mango, 44 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Papaya, 60 mg of vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Pineapple, 48 grams of vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and blueberries, 70 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Watermelon, 8 grams of vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Grapes, 90 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup


Vegetables:

· Parsley, 133 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Basil, 61 mg of vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Broccoli, 110 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Cauliflower, 47 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Brussels and cabbages, 85 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Fennel bulb, 93 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup

· Red pimento 139 mg vitamin C in 1/2 cup 


The vitamin C content of a food may decrease when cooked or stored for a long time. Fortunately, many of the best sources of vitamin C, such as fruits and vegetables, are eaten raw.



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